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The NetMinder Blog

Susan Donegan

Recent Posts

What Gets Measured Gets Managed - Adds and Drops

Posted by Susan Donegan on Thu, Apr 05, 2018

“Adds” are providers that are new to your network – or your competitor’s. Adding new providers to your network means more choice for current clients and less disruption for potential new clients and enrollees. Measuring the number of new providers added to your network, segmenting the new participants by specialty, and sharing reports with clients and prospects regularly can be useful sales tactics.

Adds_Drops

But comparing your adds to those of competitors can be even more valuable. If you’ve added more in total, or more in a particular specialty, the sales team can use this information to demonstrate growing competitive strength. And what if the competitor has added new providers you don’t have? There’s no better way to identify targets for recruitment. 

“Drops” are providers who have left the network. Turnover is an important metric, and is often included as a performance guarantee in RFPs for new business. “After adjustment for plan characteristics, health plans with higher primary care provider turnover rates had significantly lower measures of member satisfaction,” according to a study published in the American Journal of Managed Care.

It is important – and relatively easy – to measure your own turnover rate. This is an indicator executives often use in setting performance targets for provider relations teams. You should be able to drill down geographically, and by specialty. But what if a sales professional could say to a prospective client: “Our turnover rate for primary care physicians is the lowest in the state – 12.5% better than the closest competitor. If you’ve dealt with employees lately who’ve experienced disruption, you know how important that can be!” Specific, accurate comparisons are much more compelling than phrases like “low turnover.” 

Download our whitepaper to better understand the dynamics of provider networks and measuring all of the productivity index components - adds, drops, net change and total change.

Tags: healthcare providers, network disruption, network comparisons, network metrics, network analysis, network strength, network comparison tool

Gauging the Productivity of Your Network Development Activities

Posted by Susan Donegan on Wed, Mar 07, 2018

When you subtract the number of providers who leave the network from the number who've joined for a time period, you get an important metric, Net Change. Net Change measures the overall growth in a network. Potential clients are looking for long-term relationships, and while losing providers isn’t positive, the ability to replace them efficiently is a strength.  

net change.jpg

In the example above, while Network A lost 8% of its providers during the time period versus only 6% for Network B, it was able to more than replace them, with adds of 14%. Network A’s net growth of 6%, compared to the competitor’s growth of just 2%, can be positioned as a clear advantage. From a management perspective, Net Change also serves well as a key performance indicator for provider relations teams.

Another important metric is Total Change, which demonstrates the amount of movement in a network or a market. While Net Change measures network growth, Total Change simply measures movement. It shows the overall change in the makeup of the network over time. Using the previous example, Network A had a total change of 22% (14% adds plus 8% drops) versus Network B’s total change of 14% (8% adds plus 6% drops.)

total change.jpg

Employed by itself, Total Change is not all that revealing. However, when combined with Net Change, it creates a powerful new metric for gauging the productivity of your network development activities compared to internal benchmarks and relative to your competition, which we call the Network Productivity Index.   

Download our whitepaper to better understand the dynamics of provider networks and measuring all of the productivity index components - adds, drops, net change and total change.

Tags: compare networks, network comparison tool, network growth, health insurance, network productivity, healthcare providers

Synergies Helping the Dental and Vision Insurance Markets Work Together

Posted by Susan Donegan on Fri, Jan 26, 2018

In dental and vision insurance, the network is where the consumer experience happens. That’s why it’s important to know the network landscape and leverage all points of differentiation and separation from the competition.

First, a few definitions. These observations are based on a review of NetMinder data for the top 15 national dental PPO networks and the top 10 vision networks as of March 2015. A network is defined as a payer/plan combination, i.e. Delta Dental PPO or EyeMed Access. Counting methods are:  

  • Access Points: each provider at each location in a provider directory.  
  • Unique Providers: each provider one time regardless of the number of locations s/he is listed at in a provider directory.
  • Locations: each location one time regardless of the number of providers who are listed there in a provider directory.

AvgNetworkSize.jpgRelatively speaking, dental networks are much larger than vision networks. The supply of dentists is larger than the supply of optometrists and ophthalmologists. There are 65 dental schools vs. 23 optometry schools23 and nine dental specialties vs. two optometric specialties.

There is also greater demand for dental services:

demand_dental_vision.jpg

Download our whitepaper to learn more about these favorable trends as well as the synergies that help the dental and vision insurance markets work together. 


23 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dental_schools_in_the_United_States:
24https://www.quora.com/How-long-does-a-routine-dental-checkup-normally-take-in-the-U-S-if-the-patient-is-perfectlyhealthy-and-schedules-one-every-six-months
25http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/what-to-expect-checkup-eye-exam-adults#1
26 http://health.costhelper.com/teeth-cleaning.html
27 http://eyeexamcosts.com/understanding-eye-doctor-costs/

Tags: dental insurance, Vision insurance, vision networks, dental network, access points, unique providers, provider locations, practicing locations, NetMinder, network analysis, network comparison tool

NetMinder Shows the Maximum and Compares Your Network to the Competition

Posted by Susan Donegan on Fri, Dec 01, 2017

In order to present a more complete picture of network strength relative to a population, we propose including another metric – choice of providers – to the analysis. When you add the average number of providers employees can choose from to the percentage of employees with access to a minimum number of providers, you can better assess the relative strength and attractiveness of one network versus another.  NetMinder shows the maximum.jpg

Using an employee census to run a network summary report gives you the opportunity to focus your analysis on areas important to the client - do large concentrations of employees have adequate choice?Network Summary Report sample.jpg

The resulting report output shows that while My Network doesn’t have the most providers within 5 miles of the employees, (327 versus 337 for Competitor C), it does have the most choice (14 providers on average vs. 11 for Competitor B) in my census locations and it meets the accessibility criteria - 100% of employees having access to at least 5 providers. Therefore I can say to the prospect or the broker that My Network is the strongest option for this group of employees – all employees have the required network coverage and the most choices of providers. 

Watch and learn how to get the most out of NetMinder using your client's employee census.

Tags: compare networks, network comparisons, network comparison tool, health care provider, ZIP census

If You Think All Provider Networks Are Basically The Same, Think Again

Posted by Susan Donegan on Thu, Oct 19, 2017

After years of insurance companies and PPOs building and maintaining provider networks, the prevailing wisdom is that “all provider networks are basically the same.” A closer look at the composition of provider networks reveals something very different, however.

A comparison of two well-known, established provider networks in Florida shows that, while they both have almost the same number of access points (provider locations), the overlap between the two networks is only 47%. More than half of the access points in each network are unique to that network.comparison similarly sized networks.jpg

In order to better understand the differences between these two networks, we need to drill down to the specialty level. As you can see in the chart below, both networks have basically the same composition of Primary Care, Medical Specialists, and Surgeons. However, they vary significantly in other specialties such as Dental and Vision, Nursing, Therapists, and Behavioral Health.

specialties.jpg

It’s important to know which specialties are included in a provider network in order to be able to make an accurate, fair comparison.

Download our whitepaper, All Provider Networks Are Not Created Equal to learn how to use network data to demonstrate your competitive advantages for a specific client's needs.

Tags: provider networks, network comparisons, provider network, access points, provider locations, network comparison tool, provider directories

4 Ways to Measure Network Strength

Posted by Susan Donegan on Thu, Sep 14, 2017

The health insurance industry has developed a spectrum of network analysis tools to demonstrate a network’s breadth and depth, and to differentiate between networks.There are 4 common methods of network analysis widely used to evaluate health-related insurance products today. We visualize this spectrum as a pyramid to show how frequently the analysis is used and how specific the information is to each company. As you ascend the pyramid the frequency of availability decreases but the knowledge gained becomes more specific and as a result is more valuable to the overall assessment of the networks under consideration.4 ways to measure network strength.jpg

For example, at the bottom of the pyramid, measuring network size is fairly easy and is used in almost every analysis; it’s not very specific to a particular client or prospect. At the top of the pyramid, re-pricing the claims of the incumbent carrier is more difficult to do because it requires more data and cooperation from the prospect and the incumbent, therefore it’s done less frequently. However, when done, it’s very specific to the prospect’s situation. 

Download our whitepaper, The Network Analysis Pyramid for an overview of the most widely used methods to analyze provider networks.

Tags: data analysis, health insurance, compare networks, network comparison tool, network data, repricing analysis, provider networks

The Provider Directory is a Valuable Marketing Tool

Posted by Susan Donegan on Fri, Aug 25, 2017

A dental provider directory can be a valuable marketing tool for a dental plan. A large provider directory means more access to care for the members of the plan. And the conventional wisdom is the larger the directory the better.

dental-networks-over-stated.pngA provider directory grows in two ways:

  • by adding providers (dentists), and
  • by adding provider locations (places the dentist practices at).

The combination of providers (dentists) and all the locations they practice at is commonly referred to as access points, or provider/location combinations where a member can “access” care.  

The Industry Is Concerned That Access Is Overstated

One of the concerns in the industry regarding the access points counting method is that providers are being listed at more locations than they actually do or can practice at. This phenomenon is due to a few factors. First, just the like rest of us, dentists retire, sell their practices, or die. Second, associate dentists (employees) tend to move from practice to practice. In both of these situations, it is difficult for dental plans to stay on top of this information, and there may be a significant lag when updating provider directories.

Finally, and most importantly, large dental groups with multiple offices ofen require that dental carriers list all of their dentists at all of their locations, even though they may only regularly practice at 2 or 3 locations. This is so that they can easily move dentists around without disrupting claims payment from the carriers. There are more than 1,300 dental groups nationwide with 5 or more locations, with the average group having 13.7 locations, resulting in overstated access in provider directories. (NetMinder, March 2011) 

Download our whitepaper,  Are Dental Provider Directories Overstated?  to learn more about using "practicing" locations to get a better picture of network access.

Tags: provider directories, dentists, access points, network access, practicing locations, dental plans

Minimize Disruption by Maximizing Overlap

Posted by Susan Donegan on Thu, Aug 10, 2017

In order to minimize disruption for potential new clients, a dental plan needs to maximize its overlap with competitors' networks. In other words, they need to have as many of the same dentists as possible. What might be a manageable task when aiming to match up with a single competitor, this gets quite challenging for a plan with 8-10 significant competitors.network overlap.jpg

In the chart above, the blue circle represents Network A, a middle-of-the-pack network among the Top 15 dental PPO plans, while the gold circle represents the average of all of the Top 15 dental PPO plans. Network A, though quite large, only overlaps with its peers at a rate of 57%. This means that while 6 out of 10 access points in Network A's network are likely also to be in any given competitor's network, 4 out of 10 are not, and will potentially cause disruption for a prospective client. The challenge for Network A, as it is for all dental plans looking to grow, is to maximize their overlap with key competitors so that potential clients will experience minimal disruption when switching to their plan.  

Download our whitepaper, Recruit Smarter, Not Harder to learn how NetMinder data can help you target and recruit dentists more successfully and efficiently. 

Tags: disruption reporting, network disruption, network overlap, market comparison, health insurance

Six Synergies That Make Selling Dental and Vision Plans Together Smart

Posted by Susan Donegan on Wed, Jul 19, 2017

Beyond their similar relationship to medical plans, dental and vision plans have several other synergies.

The same components are evaluated during the dental and vision benefits sales processes: benefit, price, and network. Both products have defined benefit structures that can be compared on specific points. Rates are presented in tiers based on job classifications and number of people covered. Networks are less complex than medical plans and specific tools and processes have evolved to compare apples to apples.

The same network analysis tools can be used for both products to differentiate between networks. The sales process requires size comparisons, accessibility measurements, overlap/disruption analysis, and sometimes re-pricing analysis. network analysis pyramid.jpg

Beyond the departments that all companies have such as IT and facilities management, dental and vision plans can share functions like pricing, sales, marketing, and underwriting. Many multiline carriers have shared sales forces that use a single point-of-contact as a selling advantage. There are also departments that perform similar functions like recruiting and credentialing, where process synergies can come into play.

And, distribution strategies, like whether or not to be on an exchange, broker marketing strategies, and voluntary/worksite programs, since both products are voluntary-friendly, can be leveraged across both lines of business.

Download our whitepaper,  Exploring How Dental and Vision Work Together to learn more about the synergies that help the dental and vision insurance markets work together. 

Tags: dental network, vision networks, health insurance, healthcare benefits

NetMinder's Data Brings Intelligence to Recruiting

Posted by Susan Donegan on Tue, Jun 27, 2017

NetMinder provides the data you need to recruit proactively. A shorter target list of the best prospects makes it easier to succeed, and less expensive to do so.

Here are just a few of the ways network managers can use real market intelligence to recruit proactively.

  • intelligent recruiting.jpgLearn which dentists participate in many networks. They'll be more receptive to adding new networks and can help you grow more efficiently.
  • Find locations with multiple dentists. This creates efficiency in increasing sheer numbers of dentists.
  • Find dentists who practice in more than one location. This makes it easier to increase listed locations, compared to recruiting one at a time.
  • Find dentists where you know they are practicing. Confirmed by submitted claims, practicing locations are your best place to find dentists to recruit.
  • Target dentists who are heavily utilized. Selecting those with more cliams activity helps you find the more popular dentists.
  • Look for dentists who accept discounts. Prospects who accept discounts from others should be more affordable.   

Download our whitepaper, Recruit Smarter, Not Harder to learn how NetMinder data can help you target and recruit dentists more successfully and efficiently.

Tags: insurance companies, dental network, practicing locations, claims data, Healthcare, insurance networks

 

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